Your current version of the hwdVideoShare component is not compatible with this version of the hwdVideoShare Mambot, please check your versions.

Double citizenship in EU

, Two passport fast-track naturalization and "golden visas" —dual or multiple citizenshipis already part of everyday life in many European countries. With its planned reform of the country's citizenship law, Germany is following the trend.

Only a few European countries do not permit or make dual citizenship difficult. Germany, the Netherlands, Austria, Estonia, Bulgaria, Spain, Latvia and Lithuania have very strict rules regarding exceptions.

Some nations consider the prospect of additional citizenship a business model. Greece, Turkey, Portugal, Malta and certain other states offer "golden visas" and residency to certain people if they invest in real estate, start businesses and/or invest capital.

 

The naturalization is regulated very differently across Europe. As a result of the rise in global migration and refugee movements , an increase in bi-national marriages and a widespread shortage of skilled workers, many European countries have revised their citizenship laws since the 2000s.

Ancestry and place of birth determine citizenship for children, but the regulations for adult immigrants vary. The hurdles to naturalization are relatively low in France, Britain, Portugal, Poland, Sweden, Finland and Belgium — countries where immigrants can often apply for naturalization after a 5-year legal and uninterrupted stay. That period is reduced to three years if migrants are married to European nationals. They can also retain their original citizenship after naturalization.

Switzerland, Austria, Italy, Spain, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic and Slovenia require immigrants to have lived in a country legally and continuously for at least 10 years to be eligible to apply for naturalization. Ireland, Hungary, Romania and Slovakia require eight years, Denmark requires nine.

 

If Germany reforms its citizenship legislation, the country will join the ranks of nations that advocate low-threshold naturalization. If passed, the new citizenship law will "enable multiple citizenship and simplify the acquisition of German citizenship," according to the Interior Ministry.

Under the new law, German citizens who apply for a second citizenship for personal or professional reasons, for instance if they live abroad, will no longer have to give up their German citizenship or apply to retain it. Turkish citizens who have taken German citizenship will be able to reapply for a Turkish passport.

The reform overdue, says Ünal Zeran, a lawyer and migration expert. "For me, it is imperative that multiple citizenship be introduced because of the principle of equal treatment," he told DW, adding that "many Turkish families who have lived and worked in Germany for 40 years feel discriminated against because the option is already available to many people, but not to them."

In Germany, there are already various ways of having another citizenship in addition to German citizenship. For example, EU citizens are allowed to keep their original citizenship. Children born in Germany to foreign parents no longer have to decide on the nationality they want to keep by the age of 22. And many naturalized Germans can keep their passports because their country of origin does not release them from citizenship, including many refugees

 

High level EU politicians acused on Criminal court

European politicians, including the EU’s former foreign policy chief Federica Mogherini, Italy’s current and former interior ministers and the current and former prime ministers of Malta, have been named as the subjects of a criminal complaint at the international criminal court alleging they conspired with Libya’s coastguard to illegally push back refugees trying to cross the Mediterranean Sea into Europe

complaint, which was submitted at The Hague by the German NGO the European Centre for Constitutional and Human Rights (ECCHR), accuses the politicians of committing several “crimes against humanity in the form of the severe deprivation of physical liberty” between 2018 and 2021 by systematically intercepting boats in the Med and sending refugees back into detention in Libya.

The pushbacks began in February 2017 when the Italian government struck a deal with Libya, offering to fund, equip and train its coastguard to intercept and bring boats back to a country where aid agencies said they suffered abuse and torture.

 

day later, the deal was approved by the European Council.

Marco Minniti, who was the Italian interior minister at the time of the deal, is among the individuals named in the complaint as co-conspirators behind the push-back scheme. Other individuals named as co-conspirators include Matteo Salvini, the far-right leader who served as interior minister in 2018-2019 and his then chief of staff, and Matteo Piantedosi, who is now interior minister.

. (THE GUARDIAN)

Germany needs extra 400.000 immigrant workers

German government has agreed to relax its immigration laws with the aim of attracting skilled workers to its jobs market.

The cabinet wants a Canadian-style points system to bring in workers who speak German or have relevant skills.

Germany has the biggest economy in Europe but experts say it needs an extra 400,000 immigrant workers a year.

Interior Minister Nancy Faeser said the reforms would create "the most modern law on immigration in Europe".

Criticising the proposals, conservative opposition leader Friedrich Merz said Germany was failing to exploit the potential it already had and that it had more than two million people unemployed.

It already benefited from EU-wide freedom of movement, he said, but people did not want to move to Germany because "the bureaucracy is terrible, the taxes are too high".

Germany suffers from an ageing workforce and a lack of workers in construction, health and IT. Labour Minister Hubertus Heil said seven million skilled workers would be needed by 2035.

"We need people who will help us to maintain our prosperity in this country," said Rainer Dulger of the BDA employers' confederation.

SIAMO TUTTI FEMMINISTI

Dichiaramo con orgoglio "SIAMO TUTTI FEMMINISTI"!

 

Lo scrive in un tweet in occasione della Giornata internazionale per porre fine alla violenza contro le donne il Segretario Generale delle Nazioni UniteAntonio Guterres. "Prendiamo posizione e alziamo la voce a sostegno dei diritti delle donne''.

 

Guterres invita inoltre i governi ad aumentare del 50% entro il 2026 i finanziamenti alle organizzazioni e ai movimenti per i diritti delle donne.

 

"Esercitare violenza contro una donna o sfruttarla non è un semplice reato, è un crimine che distrugge l'armonia, la poesia e la bellezza che Dio ha voluto dare al mondo", sottolinea anche il Papa in un tweet.

In vista delle celebrazioni di oggi, il Senato ha approvato all'unanimità l'istituzione di una Commissione parlamentare di inchiesta sul femminicidio, nonché su ogni forma di violenza di genere. Sono centoquattro le donne uccise dall'inizio dell'anno in Italia, fino al 20 novembre 2022. I loro nomi proiettati sulla facciata di Palazzo Chigi illuminato in rosso.

SIAMO TUTTI FEMMINISTI

Dichiaramo con orgoglio "SIAMO TUTTI FEMMINISTI"!

 

Lo scrive in un tweet in occasione della Giornata internazionale per porre fine alla violenza contro le donne il Segretario Generale delle Nazioni UniteAntonio Guterres. "Prendiamo posizione e alziamo la voce a sostegno dei diritti delle donne''.

 

Guterres invita inoltre i governi ad aumentare del 50% entro il 2026 i finanziamenti alle organizzazioni e ai movimenti per i diritti delle donne.

 

"Esercitare violenza contro una donna o sfruttarla non è un semplice reato, è un crimine che distrugge l'armonia, la poesia e la bellezza che Dio ha voluto dare al mondo", sottolinea anche il Papa in un tweet.

In vista delle celebrazioni di oggi, il Senato ha approvato all'unanimità l'istituzione di una Commissione parlamentare di inchiesta sul femminicidio, nonché su ogni forma di violenza di genere. Sono centoquattro le donne uccise dall'inizio dell'anno in Italia, fino al 20 novembre 2022. I loro nomi proiettati sulla facciata di Palazzo Chigi illuminato in rosso.